chocolate - Search Results

Acid Reflux - Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder in which contents of the stomach or small intestine repeatedly move back up into the esophagus (tube connecting the throat to the stomach). This regurgitating action is called reflux. Reflux causes heartburn, and although most people have an attack of heartburn at some point in their lives, persistent reflux and severe heartburn may indicate...

Candida Albicans

Candidiasis is an infection with a fungus of the Candida strain, usually limited to the skin and mucous membranes, but sometimes is systemic and life-threatening. Candida albicans are a single cell yeast/fungus that is found in practically 100% of the population. It lives on the mucous membranes of the body, the digestive/intestinal tract, vagina and the skin.  MOST...

Candida Albicans Dietary Guide

Food Permitted Foods Foods Not Permitted Sweets Unpasteurized honey, unsulfurated black-strap molasses, raw sugar sorghum by themselves or used as sweeteners. NOTE: Use in moderation! Refined sugar, candy, chocolate....

Ecopolitan March 2012 Newsletter

Ecopolitan's monthly newsletter is back —giving you the latest and greatest information and news on Dr. T’s lecture schedule, Ecopolitan events and news, and health tips.

Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

Loss of control of the bladder by day, by night, or both. Not limited to young children. Many adolescents and adults are afflicted in this way, either constantly or in times of stress or anxiety. Dr. John W. Gerard, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Saskatchewan, presents evidence that bedwetting is sometimes the result of an allergy. "The prime problem is that the bedwetting...

Everything in Moderation

"Everything in Moderation" - Is this a good nutritional habit? What common food ingredients are truly safe to eat "in moderation"? What are the side effects? And when can we really allow ourselves to eat in moderation?

Female Conditions

Amenorrhea Absence of menstruation. Amenorrhea may be primary (the girl has never begun her periods) or secondary (the woman had her periods once and then stopped having them). Physiologic amenorrhea is the lack of menses before menarche, during pregnancy and early lactation, and after menopause (all considered normal). All other causes of amenorrhea are pathologic.   Causes of Primary...

Headache: Nonvascular

Headache without vascular cause. The most commonly diagnosed condition in the United States with 70% of these caused by muscle tension. Causes include suboccipital muscle spasms from injury (whiplash), postural strain (caused, for example, by a computer screen angled incorrectly), pillow too large that forces flexion of the neck during rest. Usually gradual onset, but tends to persist in cyclical...

Herpes Simplex

Cold Sores/Fever Blisters A spreading cutaneous eruption. Any inflammatory skin disease caused by a herpes virus and characterized by the formation of clusters of small vesicles. When used alone, the term may refer to herpes simplex or to herpes zoster.

Modified Elimination Diet

Foods to Include Foods to Avoid Fruits Unsweetened fresh, frozen, water-packed, or canned; unsweetened fruit juices except orange Oranges Vegetables All fresh raw, steamed, sautéed, juiced, or roasted vegetables Corn; creamed vegetables Starch Rice,...

Skin Conditions

Acne Vulgaris   An inflammatory disease most commonly seen in teenagers. It affects areas where sebaceous glands are largest, most numerous, and most active. Mild cases consisting of few residual signs except possibly dilated pores, and the development  of the comedo, or blackhead,  may progress through more pathological  stages of ruptured sebaceous ducts, pustule formation,...

The Occasional Junk Food

Question: Often enough, during parties or meetings, or during my travels (in and out of the airplane...), I am asked questions resembling this: "what if I have a Big Mac just once in a while? Or a Cheese Pizza once a week? Or chocolate just infrequently?"

The Occasional Junk Food - Helping your Friends to Heal

I frequently encounter the question:  "Junk food - how bad can it be if it's "only a rare occurrence"?"  Previously, I've touched on this subject; today we will complete this discussion. The past article began as follows:

What We SHOULD Eat

1.  Nutrient-Dense Leafy Greens -  daily, unlimited amounts!  The more the better! One or two types at any time. Explore the many kinds. Try kale, mustard greens, collards, dandelion greens, arugula, beet greens, parsley, cilantro, spinach, swiss chard, endive, green and red lettuce, turnip greens, lamb’s lettuce, watercress, fresh herbs, etc…...