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Blood Interpretation - Albumin/Globulin Ratio: (A/G Ratio)
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Blood Interpretation
Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Lipoprotein a (Lp(a))
Apolipoprotein A-l (Apo A-1)
Apolipoprotein B (Apo B)
Triglycerides
Fibrinogen
C-Reactive Protein
Homocysteine
Fasting Glucose
Fasting Serum Insulin
Sodium
Potassium
Chloride
Carbon Dioxide (CO2)
BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen)
Creatinine
BUN/Creatinine Ratio
Uric Acid
Calcium
Phosphorus
Alkaline Phosphatase
Total Protein
Albumin
Globulin
Albumin/Globulin Ratio: (A/G Ratio)
Calcium/Albumin Ratio: (Ca/A ratio)
GGT (Gamma-glutamyl transferase)
SGOT: (also known as AST)
SGPT: (also known as ALT)
LDH
Total Bilirubin
CPK
Serum Iron (Fe)
Thyroid Profile
T4 : (tetra-iodothyronine)
T7: (also known as FTI [free thyroid index])
Basal Body Temperatute Studies for Thyroid Function
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Albumin/Globulin Ratio: (A/G Ratio)

(normal value is 1.2 - 1.5)

NOTE: A low (reversed, or inverted) A/G ratio less than 1.0, is one of the 4 ominous signs. These people may

have a serious, developing, or currently manifesting pathological process.

 

If the patient exhibits a decreased A/G ratio, consider the following:

  • Neoplasm, including multiple myeloma or metastatic disease
  • Infectious disease including AIDS
  • Intestinal disease
  • Liver disease
  • Renal disease
  • The cachexic patient
  • CHF

 

The following nutritional agents may be considered for those patients with a decreased A/G ratio:

  • The physician must determine what pathology is developing or already present, and treat accordingly.

NOTE: If the patient possesses an elevated A/G ratio, this phenomenon is not considered to be clinically significant.



Last Updated on Saturday, 14 March 2009 02:39