Vitamin C - Search Results

Tendinitis

Inflammation of the tendon and the lining of the tendon sheath. The sheath is typically the focus of the involvement, but the body's inflammatory response usually involves the tendon, too. The etiology is unknown, although repetitive or forceful trauma, exercise or strain, systemic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, gout, Reiter's syndrome) and hypercholesterolemia are implicated.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

The Natural Approach Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects the entire body but especially the synovial membranes of the joints. It is a classic example of an "autoimmune disease," a condition in which the body's immune system attacks the body's own tissue. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, it affects primarily the joints. The...

Bursitis

Bursitis is an Acute or chronic inflammation in a bursa. Bursae are thin-walled sacs lined with synovial fluid and function to lubricate and ease the movement of the tendons and muscles over bony prominences. Causes of bursitis include trauma; systemic disease (such as arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis); gout; repetitive or excessive frictional force; or infection. Most commonly, bursitis is...

Hepatitis

Inflammation of the liver characterized by patchy or generalized hepatocellular necrosis There are 4 major kinds of hepatitis: type A, type B, type D, and type non-A, non-B. The disease is viral in origin and although types A, B, and D can be distinguished by their antigenic properties, all four display a clinically similar picture.  Other less common infective causes of hepatitis include...

Herpes Zoster (Shingles)

Definition An acute infection caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus and involving the dorsal root ganglia; causes eruptions and neuralgia on the skin corresponding to the distribution of the affected root ganglia; commonly known as "shingles."

Myofibrositis

Scar-type tissue causing restriction of tissue motion. Traumatic tearing of soft tissues or long standing muscle spasms cause production of thixotropic gel which organizes itself into collagen scar tissue. This is the body's attempt to stabilize what is perceived as injury. Three problems result from this scar formation:

Fracture

Any break in a bone. There are many types of fractures:

Facet Syndrome

Facet syndrome is used to describe chronic or acute inflammation of the articular facet joints which guide vertebral motion. These joints are lined by cartilage and surrounded by capsular ligaments which are richly innervated by pain fibers. These joints are inflamed by trauma (as in flexion/extension injuries; "whiplash") or in overloading injuries such as lifting a heavy load and...

Periodontal Disease

Gingivitis, Periodontitis, and Scorbutic Gums Periodontal disease is a scourge on our society. It accounts for more lost teeth in adulthood than any other dental problem. Gum disease will affect nine out of ten Americans, and one out of every four persons will lose all their teeth to periodontal disease by age 60. Thirty-two million Americans have gum disease right now in such an advanced state...

Blood Interpretation

Cholesterol Cholesterol values should only be analyzed after a 12 hour fast. Further, the physician must be aware that the patient's posture prior to the blood draw is significant. If the patient has been in a recumbent posture for more than 20 minutes, cholesterol values may be up to 15% lower than normal. Cholesterol is a blood fat which is the prime building block component to make...

Liver / Gallbladder

Hepatopathy: any disease of the liver. Hepatotoxin: a toxin that destroys liver cells. Cholestasis: stoppage or suppression of bile flow, due to factors within (intrahepatic cholestasis) or outside the liver (extrahepatic cholestasis). Cirrhosis: a liver disease characterized pathologically by the loss of the normal microscopic lobular architecture and regenerative...

Skin Conditions

Acne Vulgaris   An inflammatory disease most commonly seen in teenagers. It affects areas where sebaceous glands are largest, most numerous, and most active. Mild cases consisting of few residual signs except possibly dilated pores, and the development  of the comedo, or blackhead,  may progress through more pathological  stages of ruptured sebaceous ducts, pustule formation,...

Glossitis and Tongue Related Conditions

An acute or chronic inflammation of the tongue. Glossitis may be either a primary or secondary manifestation of disease. Systemic disorders that may cause the problem include: vitamin deficiency (esp. B vitamins), anemia (pernicious or iron deficiency) and a multitude of skin diseases (aphthous lesions, pemphigus, erythema multiform, lichen planus, etc.). Local problems that may give rise to...

Herpes Simplex

Cold Sores/Fever Blisters A spreading cutaneous eruption. Any inflammatory skin disease caused by a herpes virus and characterized by the formation of clusters of small vesicles. When used alone, the term may refer to herpes simplex or to herpes zoster.

Intervertebral Disc Disease

Rupture of the annulus fibroses causing leaking of the nucleus pulposus into the intradural space. Also called herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, ruptured disc, or disc syndrome. The cause is degeneration of the fibers of the annulus fibrosus, or trauma of the area leading to the rupture of the annulus. Rupture usually occurs at middle age or older. Then, the normal pressure that...

Eye Conditions

Cataracts   Cataracts are clumps of protein that collect on the lens of an eye and interfere with vision. Normally, light passes through the lens (the clear tissue behind the pupil) and focuses on the retina. The retina is the light-sensitive layer of the eye that sends visual signals to the brain. A cataract occurs when the normally clear lens becomes cloudy. Most cataracts develop slowly...

Blood Sugar Dysregulation / Metabolic Syndrome

General nutritional support strategies for individuals with any dysglycemic response. i.e. Metabolic Syndrome (lnsulin Resistance and Hyperinsulinemia) Type II Diabetes Reactive Hypoglycemia. NOTE: "Type 1 Diabetes" see Autoimmune Section  

Low Back Pain

Pain felt either in the lumbar, lumbosacral, or sacroiliac areas. Most low back pain is from degenerative joint disease in the lumbosacral region, poor posture, the beer belly, constipation, and stress-induced myospasms of the lumbosacral region. Low back pain is commonly associated with sciatica. The prognosis depends on the cause. Generally, the condition is benign and the prognosis is...

Osteoporosis

A decreased density of bone compared to normal bone mass of age and sex matched controls. It is the most prevalent bone disease in the world. There are many factors that can contribute to osteoporosis, the most common is postmenopausal, estrogen deficient osteoporosis. More than one-half of women in the United States who are 50 years of age or older will have documented osteoporosis,...

Asthma

Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways restricts airflow in and out of the lungs. The word asthma comes from the Greek word for "panting." The panting and wheezing sound characteristic of asthma occur because of the restricted flow of air. Normally, when you breathe in an irritant or are subjected to a stressor such as exercise, your airways relax and open, allowing...

Fertility / Sexual Dysfunction - Male and Female

10-15% of couples experience the inability to conceive, and the percentage is growing. Men account for 40% of failures to conceive. Of the women who are responsible, failure to ovulate accounts for 30% of infertility problems; pelvic factors (such as tubal disease and endometriosis) account for 50%; cervical pathology is responsible 10% of the time; and in 10-20% of the women no reason is...

Frozen Shoulder

A syndrome in which a stiff shoulder is restricted and painful in both active and passive movement. Also known as adhesive capsulitis, periarthritis, and pericapsulitis. The involved joints are the scapulothoracic and glenohumeral. There is no bony ankylosis. Causes include any type of pain in the shoulder upon movement, and immobilization from shoulder injury. Frozen shoulder is seen most often...

Female Conditions

Amenorrhea Absence of menstruation. Amenorrhea may be primary (the girl has never begun her periods) or secondary (the woman had her periods once and then stopped having them). Physiologic amenorrhea is the lack of menses before menarche, during pregnancy and early lactation, and after menopause (all considered normal). All other causes of amenorrhea are pathologic.   Causes of Primary...

Gout

Gout is a type of arthritis that occurs when too much uric acid builds up in the body, causing crystals to form in joints and joints to become inflamed. It can be hereditary or the result of another condition. Gout usually affects men over 40 with a family history of gout, but it can occur at any time and also affects women, especially after menopause. Excessive intake of food and alcohol,...

Cancer

What are the nutritional strategies in treatment of cancer? Here is your guide to enhancing the immune / antioxidant status, enzyme therapy, chemotherapy and / or radiation therapy support and suggested nutritional supplementation.

Nepali Eco-Trek FAQ

FAQ –Nepali Humanitarian Eco-Trek with Dr. Tel-Oren When trek participants arrive in Kathmandu will there be someone at the airport to meet them? Please provide Angie with your complete & accurate flight information (arrival date/time, departure city). A team member will hold up a sign with your name on it and will then transport you to the hotel. If there is a problem (flight delay,...